Fiilex colour-changing LED sources “to lead specular revolution”

DiCon, a Californian designer and manufacturer of light emitting diodes, has announced the launch of a new lighting brand called Fiilex, which they say will introduce "a new class of innovative specular LED light fixtures".

Fiilex P360

DiCon, a Californian designer and manufacturer of light emitting diodes, has announced the launch of a new lighting brand called Fiilex, which they say will introduce “a new class of innovative specular LED light fixtures”. Fiilex makes its debut with two different light sources: the P360 Portable Specular LED Light and P200 FlexJet Illuminator.

The first, the P360, is a 90W LED lamp running on a 12–28V power supply. It is a bi-colour light, meaning that you can set the colour temperature to 3000K (tungsten), 5600K (daylight) or anything in between to suit your lighting scenario. Accessories for the P360 include a folding softbox, barndoors, a fresnel, gel holders and an umbrella mount.

Fiilex P360

Thanks to something called Dense Matrix LED technology — DiCon’s way of fitting lots of light emitting diodes in a small array — the P360 is only four inches in diameter (“the approximate size of a coffee mug”) and weighs less than a kilogram, making it much easier to handle than much bigger conventional LED panels.

The LEDs are the result of ten years of research and development, the company says.

Fiilex’s second new light is the P200, or “FlexJet Illuminator”, which takes on an altogether unconventional form factor. The main body of the light is similar in size to the P360. You can select almost any colour you like in the visible spectrum, not just standard “white” light of different Kelvin temperatures but anything from pink and purple to red and green, then set it as one of eight selectable channels.

Fiilex P200 FlexJet

Where it really gets interesting is in the accessories. With fibre-optic attachments, you can bend and shape your colour-changing cool-running light source to any shape that takes your fancy, from light sabres and ring lights to hearts and helices. Some examples are shown off in the following promotional “behind-the-scenes” video.

According to the Fiilex web site, dealers and rental houses are “currently adding inventory” so we don’t know who will carry their products yet, or for how much. For more information on the company and its products, visit fiilex.com or diconlighting.com.

What do you think? Is this the future for photographic lighting? Can you see yourself using one of these new lights in your work?

Update: Introductory pricing is $700-800 for each light here.

David Selby
Based in Paris, France, David Selby is editor of Lighting Rumours, a part-time photographer and a quantitative analyst.
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