Hang up your speedlights with the iDC Plastic Slipper

Using the Plastic Slipper it's possible to suspend a speedlight and radio trigger from picture hooks, coat pegs or a 3M Command Strip.

iDC Plastic Slipper holding a Canon 430EX II and PocketWizard FlexTT5

As a professional events photographer you’re keen to get the best lighting possible to capture the moment. You want to use off-camera flash but don’t have the luxury of setting up light stands for your candid shots. Perhaps it’s a very cosy venue and space is at a premium. What do you do?

One company from Arizona has come up with a novel solution. Hang your speedlight up! Using the iDC Plastic Slipper it’s possible to suspend a speedlight and radio trigger from picture hooks, coat pegs, tree branches or cupboard knobs.

iDC Plastic Slipper holding a Canon 430EX II and PocketWizard FlexTT5
iDC Plastic Slipper holding a Canon 430EX II and PocketWizard FlexTT5

As the name suggests, the Plastic Slipper doesn’t use much fancy technology – it’s basically a piece of plastic with some holes in it. So your speedlight won’t be as secure as if you had it on a Super Clamp but at the same time you’re less likely to miss the “decisive moment” because set-up is instantaneous.

iDC Plastic Slipper

According to a spokesperson, “It really is a smart way to get a lot of use out of one’s speedlites.¬†A wedding photographer can pepper their speedlites around a reception room by hanging them on the wall or setting them on various surfaces for documentary¬†style ‘Wedding Getting Ready’ shots.”

“The universal 3M Command Strip is the perfect¬†vehicle¬†for hanging these,” they added.

The Slipper can also be used on uneven surfaces to provide a more stable base than your tabletop stand so that your flashgun doesn’t tip over.

The iDC Plastic Slipper costs US$19.99 and comes with a hex screw and slotted screw to secure your coldshoe or tabletop stand to the platform. It is not compatible with light stands. Visit the iDC store for more details.

David Selby
David is a keen photographer and has been editor of Lighting Rumours since 2010. When not writing about lighting, he works as a data scientist at the University of Manchester, UK.
selbydavid.com