Long-range lighting challenge: win a flash!

July competition. Submit your photographs to win a LumoPro LP180 flashgun worth $199.99!

LumoPro LP180

The deadline has now passed. Thanks for your submissions. View the results here!

It’s competition time again.

One thing that always features in the tech specs of a new flash trigger is its range¬†‚ÄĒ often 100 metres (330 feet) or more. PocketWizard in particular specifies a whopping 500m (1600ft) range for its radio slaves. And even some¬†cheap no-brand units claim to¬†work 100 feet away. But how often do most photographers¬†have their lights¬†anywhere near that far from the camera?

LumoPro LP180Your challenge, then, is to submit a photograph with the lights 30 metres (100 feet) or farther from the camera. Any subject is fine, from sports to wildlife to¬†flash landscapes to portraiture to architecture. Keep it safe for work, please. You can use flash or continuous lighting, but ambient light such as the Sun (1.496√ó10^8 km away) doesn’t count!

The first prize is a LumoPro LP180 flashgun, worth $199.99 (pictured right; check our review here). Provided from the editor’s own stash.

To enter, upload &¬†attach an image¬†to a¬†comment and post it below this article. If you’d like to enter more than one image, please attach them all to the same comment if you can. Accompanying your entry with lighting information (or even a setup shot) would be appreciated.

You can also up/down-vote photographs from other entrants if you like. The final decision rests with the Lighting Rumours staff judges, who will consider photos’¬†creativity, visual appeal and (where applicable) sheer ridiculousness of range.

The deadline for entries is midnight (BST) on 30th July 2014, so you have over a month to prepare the best images you can. The competition is open to our readers from all over the world.

Here’s one I made earlier:

Christmas Eve

David Selby
David is a keen photographer and has been editor of Lighting Rumours since 2010. When not writing about lighting, he works as a data scientist at the University of Manchester, UK.
selbydavid.com