MeiKe R200 close-up lighting system ‘supports 8 flashes at once’

MeiKe has announced the R200, a modular close-up flash photography system for Canon, Nikon and Sony.

MeiKe R200

Chinese manufacturer MeiKe has announced the R200, a modular close-up flash photography system for Canon, Nikon and Sony.

Effectively¬†a clone of Nikon’s R1C1 Wireless Speedlight kit, MeiKe’s macro lighting¬†setup comprises a lens-mounted ring to which up to eight R200 flashes (like SB-R200s) can be attached. They are controlled from a commander unit on the camera hotshoe, which communicates with them via optical signals.

MeiKe R200

As well as TTL, manual and simple optical slave modes, the system supports a conventional optical wireless TTL system, with master and slave control. Unlike their other upcoming flash, the MK420, the R200 does not have built-in radio. Each flash has a guide number of 15 as well as high-speed synchronisation (HSS) up to 1/8000 second. The heads appear to be based on the same design as the MeiKe MK320, which means they have built-in LED lamps for focussing, video or modelling purposes as well.

MeiKe R200

Though you can theoretically fit eight flashes around¬†the mounting ring, in practice this would be very heavy and could put a great strain on your lens. But you don’t necessarily need to mount them to your lens to enjoy the benefits of controlling many flashes at once: you could position¬†them off-camera. Still, the idea sounds cool and if MeiKe has come up with some way of making an eight-flash close-up lighting setup viable, more power to them.

Eight flashes of GN 15 each would have a combined guide number of roughly 42, which would also allow it to be used as a conventional ring flash for more distant subjects.

MeiKe R200

MeiKe will release the R200 system at the P&E imaging trade fair, which is held from 22 to 25 April at the China National Convention Center in Beijing. For more information, visit mkgrip.com.

David Selby
David is a keen photographer and has been editor of Lighting Rumours since 2010. When not writing about lighting, he works as a data scientist at the University of Manchester, UK.
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